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Chronic Pain & Substance Use Disorder

Chronic Pain & Substance Use Disorder

Chronic pain and substance use disorder are both serious health conditions that can have a significant impact on an individual’s quality of life. They are also closely related, with chronic pain often leading to the development of a substance use disorder and vice versa.

Chronic Pain

Chronic pain is defined as pain that persists for longer than six months. It can be caused by a variety of conditions, including arthritis, fibromyalgia, neuropathic pain, and chronic headaches. It can also be a result of a past injury, such as a broken bone that has healed or surgery. Chronic pain can have a significant impact on an individual’s quality of life, leading to decreased functioning, decreased ability to work, and decreased ability to participate in activities of daily living.

Substance Use Disorder

Substance use disorder is a condition in which an individual has a maladaptive pattern of using a substance that leads to significant impairment or distress. It is characterized by symptoms such as tolerance, withdrawal, and persistent use despite negative consequences. This can be caused by using a substance such as alcohol, opioids, stimulants, and cannabis. Substance use disorder can have a significant impact on an individual’s mental and physical health, as well as their relationships, their ability to work, and their ability to engage in activities of daily living.

Chronic Pain & Substance Use Disorder

Chronic pain and substance use disorder often co-occur, with chronic pain increasing the risk of developing a substance use disorder and substance use disorder increasing the risk of developing chronic pain. This is known as the “Pain-Substance Use Disorder Spiral,” where patients with chronic pain often turn to substances to manage their pain. However, this can lead to a dangerous cycle where patients develop a substance use disorder, and their pain becomes worse over time, leading to the need to take more of the substance.

Traditional Treatment

Treatment for chronic pain and substance use disorder often involves a combination of medication and therapy. For chronic pain, there are several treatment options available, including over-the-counter and prescription medications, physical therapy, and alternative therapies such as acupuncture and massage.

For substance use disorder, the most effective treatment is behavioral therapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), motivational interviewing, and contingency management. Medications, such as buprenorphine, methadone, and naltrexone, may also be used to help manage withdrawal symptoms and cravings.

Ketamine for Chronic Pain and Substance Use Disorder

Ketamine is an anesthetic agent which has been found to be effective in treating chronic pain as well as substance use disorder. It works by changing the activity of certain neurotransmitters in the brain, including glutamate and GABA, which are thought to play a role in pain perception and addiction.

Research has found that ketamine infusion therapy can be effective in reducing chronic pain and substance use disorder by providing fast-acting relief and by working to change the neural pathways associated with pain and addiction. It is considered a promising treatment option for those suffering from chronic pain and substance use disorder, as traditional medications may not be as effective.

The Best Place to Receive Treatment

At NeuroRelief, we offer ketamine infusion therapy for those suffering from chronic pain and substance use disorder. We have highly trained providers who understand the connection between the two conditions and are dedicated to providing personalized and compassionate care. We work with their clients to develop customized treatment plan that addresses their specific needs and goals. Our goal is not just to help alleviate their symptoms but also to help them regain control of their lives. Contact NeuroRelief today to find out how they can help you find relief from chronic pain and substance use disorder.